#92. Find and read from cover to cover a magazine about science or some branch of science

IDEA #92. Go to a library or a bookstore (or maybe ask a science teacher at your school) to find and read from cover to cover a magazine about science or some branch of science. Scientific American would be a natural choice, but there are magazines about astronomy, environmental science, and technology that are pretty easy to find.

In the world of science—any science—periodicals serve a paramount purpose as the vehicle through which the results of virtually all scholarly research are made public. Even Scientific American, which has been published for more than a century as the most prominent magazine for laymen as well as scientists, occasionally presents new findings, and it remains important as a monthly summary of the most significant issues and compelling ideas in the field.

But along with Scientific American there are a host of magazines, some highly technical and others written for non-scientists, whose aims are to introduce their readership to the excitement and challenge of science in the twenty-first century. Science and Nature are probably the most prestigious general publications for scientists and medical researchers, while popular magazines like Science News and BBC Focus cover many issues.

Specific sciences also have their own magazines. Astronomy and Sky & Telescope are leading astronomy magazines, but there are other very readable periodicals in fields from archaeology to zoology. There are also many, many magazines with a technical focus, some general and others relating specifically to a single aspect of computer science, say, or alternative energy.

The youngster who can spend some time leafing through one of these magazines is likely to find a few articles of interest, a few things that are intellectually challenging, and very likely an entertaining but partially baffling array of advertisements and non-editorial content that serve, if nothing else, to provide a sense of the complexity and richness of the world of science.

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